Pulling RSS data into Excel (or: Using Excel to Search Craigslist) – Part 1

This blog post is brought to you by Dan Battagin a Lead Program Manager on the Excel team. OK, so I’m going to talk a bit about a relatively unknown feature in Excel: XML data import. It was introduced in Excel 2003, but we’ve done a pretty good job hiding it since Excel 2007 by putting it on the Developer tab of the Ribbon.

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Pulling RSS data into Excel (or: Using Excel to Search Craigslist) – Part 1

Using PowerPivot with Excel 2010

In this blog article, we’ll step through using PowerPivot for Excel 2010 for building a rich application in Excel. Note: following screenshots describe the SQL Server 2008 R2 August Community Technology Preview (CTP) functionality for a feature codenamed Gemini.

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Using PowerPivot with Excel 2010

Introducing PowerPivot

Today we have a guest author from the SQL Server Analysis Services team, Ashvini Sharma, to tell us about the PowerPivot (née Gemini) feature that you may have heard about recently. PowerPivot is the recently announced name of technologies this blog previously referred to by its codename, Gemini

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Introducing PowerPivot

Creating a Custom Popup Menu

Today’s author is Derek Mang, owner of Systems Solution Developers Inc. You can find more useful tips from Derek on his website: www.officevbasolutions.com .

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Creating a Custom Popup Menu

The DisplayFormat OM

New features in conditional formatting extend to the object model as well. Excel has traditionally allowed users to access the formatting of their cells through the object model. For example, Users can use the interior class which lives off the range object to access the formatting of the cell.

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The DisplayFormat OM

Add Buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar and Customize Button Images

Today’s author is Ron de Bruin, an Excel MVP .

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Add Buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar and Customize Button Images

Sparklines in Excel

Thanks to Sam Radakovitz, a Program Manager on the Excel team, for putting together this series on Sparklines. For Excel 2010 we’ve implemented sparklines, “intense, simple, word-sized graphics” , as their inventor Edward Tufte describes them in his book Beautiful Evidence .  Sparklines help bring meaning and context to numbers being reported and, unlike a chart, are meant to be embedded into what they are describing: In the above example, the sales number alone gives you a single moment in time, but adding sparklines in the table, next to the numbers it’s describing, gives history and shows a pattern of sales.  The sparklines aren’t floating on the grid of Excel like a chart does.  They aren’t rows, column, or sheets away from the data.  They are in the table giving context to the numbers, unobtrusively, and appear like text in the cell.

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Sparklines in Excel

Excel 2010 – The 10,000 ft. View

Before we begin our whirlwind tour of all things Excel, I thought I’d give you a quick glance at the things we’ve done.  The “table of contents” if you will.

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Excel 2010 – The 10,000 ft. View

Sneak Preview of Project Gemini

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Sneak Preview of Project Gemini

On the topic of “teasers”, one of the things we’ll be talking about in the coming weeks is project Gemini.  I won’t get into the details just yet (otherwise it wouldn’t be a teaser), other than to say it’s a powerful data analysis feature, it’s an add-in to Excel (i.e. not a built-in Excel feature), and it’s the result of collaboration between the Excel and SQL teams.  The BI Blog has been covering all news related to Gemini .  From the BI Blog, here are a couple sneak peak videos : BI Power Hour: Sneak Preview of Gemini – part 1 Get a sneak preview of the new functionality for BI within Excel with Project Gemini. This demo shows how you can quickly analyze massive amounts of data, create connections to data, and share insights all within the familiar Excel environment