SharePoint Data-Bound Design with Expression Blend

Data-Bound Design: Create a Silverlight 4 Web Part for SharePoint 2010 See how designers and developers can work together creating rich SharePoint applications in my MSDN article: Data-Bound Design: Create a Silverlight 4 Web Part for SharePoint 2010…( read more )

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SharePoint Data-Bound Design with Expression Blend

VS 2010 productivity improvements – Part I

Every developer deserves a fantastic development environment that allows them to write, understand, navigate, and debug code as efficiently as possible.  After all, developers spend most of their time in the IDE. As we designed and built Visual Studio 2010, we let this principle guide the product, and I think we've delivered an IDE that raises the development experience bar significantly.  Starting today and over the coming weeks, I will highlight my favorite productivity features in Visual Studio 2010.  Some of them are small features, and some of them required a large, coordinated effort across the team, but each one makes developers' lives a little easier

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VS 2010 productivity improvements – Part I

SharePoint Solution using BCS: Part II

In my initial post on this, I created a read-only application that used a Web service.

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SharePoint Solution using BCS: Part II

Sharepoint 2010 development using bcs

One of the big features for SharePoint 2010 (and for building OBAs) is the Business Connectivity Services (BCS). I’ve written a few posts on this, but wanted to follow up on these early posts with some additional detail on how to create a solution leveraging web services

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Sharepoint 2010 development using bcs

New SharePoint 2010 Developer Center on MSDN

The new SharePoint 2010 (Beta) Developer Center on MSDN is now live. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint/ee514561.aspx There is a lot of great information for developing SharePoint solutions. Some of the articles include What’s new in SharePoint…( read more )

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New SharePoint 2010 Developer Center on MSDN

Build a Collapsible Task Pane in Outlook – Part 2

In part 1 of this series I gave a (brief) overview of the Outlook Task Pane and provided a couple of links to articles on MSDN that explain how to build one.

Recap – 2 Problems with Task Panes within Outlook

Building a task pane and displaying it within Outlook is easy but as I mentioned in Part 1, there are a couple of problems:

  1. Managing the multiple Task Pane instances, attaching to the Explorer and Inspector windows, and destroying each task pane when its Explorer or Inspector windows closes can be a pain.
  2. The task pane you build does not come with an “collapse” button. You know, the button with a couple of chevrons pointing in the direction it will collapse? You have to add this functionality yourself. It can be done but there are easier methods.

This brings me back to the point of this series, Add-In-Express 2009 (ADX). This tool takes care of Issue #1 and. Issue #2. Yes, ADX costs a few bucks but it’s a time-saver and it reduces development effort. Either one of those is typically reason enough for me to purchase a tool (especially if the client is paying for it).

Quick Overview of the Design for the Collapsible Task Pane

By collapsible, I mean it can be "minimized" so that it resembles the collapsed state of the ToDo Bar. The task pane has a “collapse” button and resides between the mail preview window and the ToDO bar within Outlook Explorer windows.

Here is the design for the sample add-in I will build in Part 3:

Outlook_open

The task pane displays exactly where it should. You can see the collapse button on the upper right-hand corner of the task pane. When the user clicks that button, they will see something like this image:

Outlook-collapsed

In this collapsed-state, only a vertical bar displays with an “expand” button. Clicking the expand button will return the task pane to its open state.

Preview of Part 3

Next-up, I’ll dig into the code and actually build the add-in. Also, I’ll decide on what to display within the task pane besides a lame button. Not to worry, I’ll think of something useful to put there and it will be code you can steal…put to use today.

Office Developer Resources Ribbon Tab Add-in

Install a custom tab in Word 2007 that contains links to developer resources on the Office Developer Center on MSDN. The tab provides one-click access to the how-to articles, videos, code samples, SDKs, and product information of most importance to Office developers.

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Office Developer Resources Ribbon Tab Add-in

Retrieve SharePoint List Data with XLINQ using VS 2010 Beta 1

One of the key things you’ll likely want to do with SharePoint is interact a lot with lists.

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Retrieve SharePoint List Data with XLINQ using VS 2010 Beta 1

Another Office Customization with Beta 1 – Excel Add-in with Custom Task Pane

I recently downloaded the Visual Studio 2010 Beta 1 and have been playing around with the different features for Office Business Application development. For the public Beta 1, you’ll be limited to the 2007-centric templates (e.g. Excel 2007 Add-in, Word 2007 Document, etc.), but the nice thing is that if you’re familiar with these templates when future Betas are released you’ll already have had a chance to get experience with the Beta 1

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Another Office Customization with Beta 1 – Excel Add-in with Custom Task Pane

Announcing MSDN Code Search Preview: Find Code Samples on MSDN

MSDN Code Search Preview to search for code samples across the MSDN Library, MSDN Code Gallery, and CodePlex. Take advantage of advanced filtering, filter by language, and more to help you find code samples.

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Announcing MSDN Code Search Preview: Find Code Samples on MSDN